Gandhi, Bose & Dr. Ambedkar

Editorial

All the three Gandhi, Bose and Dr. Ambedkar fought for independence of the country and the betterment of the India people, more so Dr. Ambedkar who launched a social revolution for the upliftment of the downtrodden. They are a part of the large family of people who got us our much valued Independence.
Gandhi, a son of a rich zamindar of Gujarat who was Prime Minister of the princely province of Kathiawar went to study Law at the Bar in England, was helped in his legal practice by a rich Muslim family in South Africa. In fact, the goodness and helpful nature of this family, an effect that prevailed on him for all his life because of this with Gandhiji it was always muh main Ram, dil me Allah. Non-violence was a common form of protest that was practised in South Africa at the time Gandhi was there, something he brought to India when he came to take over the running campaign of India’s freedom struggle, he got us freedom but a split one with a lot of Needless bloodshed. India’s freedom struggle starts from the day Dada Abdulla & sons hired a lawyer who could speak Gujarati to settle a family dispute in Durban, South Africa. On his visit to the court the judge asked him to remove his turban, (Pagdi) a symbol and dress accessory, he refused and left the court, then on his way to Pretoria in South Africa to appear in a court case, he was asked by the ticket collector of the first class compartment he was travelling with a valid ticket to go to a third class one, based on his race, Gandhi refused and was taken off the train in Pietermaritzburg station on that night of 7th June 1893, was ignited a spark for freedom that ended in India’s independence on 15th August 1947. As a young lawyer, Gandhi believed “I realised the true function of a lawyer was to unite parties riven asunder”. Gandhi believed and argued “That Indians could not demand their rights as British citizens if they were not willing to show loyalty to the British Empire”. A sense of responsibility that saw Indian soldiers fighting with the British in many areas including the World War 2. But the trigger to freedom was the Royal Indian Navy (RIN) mutiny that broke out on 18th February 1946 at all major Indian ports and with over 2.5 million Indian soldiers fresh from the Second World War back , as Swaminathan Anklesaria Aiyar says in 1967 “The then British High Commissioner John Freeman said “ The British were petrified of a repeat of the 1857 mutiny, since this time they feared they would be slaughtered to the last man” This mutiny spread to naval establishments in Madras, Calcutta and around the country, as the leaders of the Congress refused to extend support, it was put down with a iron hand by the British.
Bose a man of vision, who felt that if the British would not give us freedom, we would have to win it over from them, in fact snatch it from them. As the Congress Party President he was sent out of the party as he had differences with Gandhiji, for his fight to get his country freedom, he got lost in history to be a great son of this land of ours. How he went and where he went after his plane crashed in which he was supposed to be, and as per records no plane crashed at the place or at the time it was supposed to happen is a promise all plan to reveal, but it stands as a promise. Sentencing him and his Indian National Army after the World War 2 by the British saw riots in the forces that convinced the British that it was time to leave India and go. They split India into three parts; the flames of anger are still burning keeping the sub-continent a theatre of war for ever.
Bose wanted complete independence and Gandhi wanted it in phases. Both wanted Independence of India but the approach was different.
Dr. Ambedkar who compiled our Constitution was a man who was disillusioned with the treatment given to the lower strata of society in our country, so upset was he that he and his followers changed their religion from Hindusium to Buddhism. He wanted to have a common civil code for all the people in the country a burning issue still relevant.
It looks the time has come to sort out most of these issues that these great men wanted.

Gandhi, Bose & Dr. Ambedkar


Subhas Chandra Bose’s Life Philosophy: Major Foundation of his Thought and its Impact on India
Prof. Tridib Chakraborti

Subhas Chandra Bose remains a leading personality, who  has symbolized himself as a leading/dominant  freedom fighter, a true guide and a devoted friend of the Indian people and the world. As one of the chief architects of the Indian freedom movement, he awakened the country’s masses from the slavish siesta of self-degradation and stimulated their sense about its cultural, historical and national glory. During his entire life period, he enlightened the Indian masses about their feelings, self consciousness and duties for the country’s independence and mankind. The philosophical foundation of Subhas Chandra Bose’s political thought, as a person of humanity, was developed based on the influences of several personalities, several international freedom struggle events, impact of parents, various religions and his personal experience of life. This article will highlight the multiple facets, which made Subhas Chandra Bose a true humanist and freedom fighter in the pages of Indian history.

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Dr. Ambedkar and Buddhism: Deliverance from Isolation
Prof. Anuradha Mukherjee

Ambedkar was convinced that conversion will draw the Dalits out of their isolation. To him, Buddhism as a philosophy based on justice and not on the salvation of the soul could be the right religion for the Dalits. It was not meant to be an escape but a collective revolt that also , made a significant step in the resurgence of Buddhism in the country of its origin in all the glory of the humanity it preached.

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India and Her Destiny: The Mission and Role of Mahatma Gandhi, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar
Dr. Ashok Kumar Panda & Aniruddha Purushotham

The object of this thesis is to decipher and analyse India’s destiny, in the context of the struggle for freedom, in the first half of the twentieth century. The role and mission of Mahatma Gandhi, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar are central to our understanding of the developments, political and social, which culminated in India attaining political freedom in 1947.

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Ambedkar: A Crusader for Justice
Prof. Anil Kumar Mohapatra & Binoda Kumar Kar

The very essence of Ambedkar’s vision of social justice was to establish a just, equitable and fair society, where the women, scheduled castes and scheduled tribes would get their due place in the society and for that he did incorporate the provisions in the Indian Constitution so that they would get adequate opportunities so that they could be freed from the then prevalent social evils and ill-practices in the society. As an ardent champion of the cause, he sacrificed his whole life for the amelioration of the conditions of such people in the Indian society. Therefore, he is even hailed today as the messiah of the oppressed and downtrodden.

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If wishes were horses and Bose were President!
Himansu Sekhar Pati

I was a student of Ranihat High School at Cuttack in the mid-sixties. I will never forget how we used to eagerly look forward to January 23rd, the Birthday of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose. All the boys of the school would wind our way to a mansion in Odia Bazaar and assemble there to pay our heartfelt homage to that great son of the soil. I distinctly recollect being overwhelmed by a feeling of patriotism and bravery as I listened to narrations about the exploits of Subhas Bose.

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Gandhian Approach to a Non-Violent World Order
Dr. Sailaja Gullapalli

The world has always been afflicted with conflicts of all sorts.  The last two centuries have been extremely conflict-prone with persistent problems, two major world wars and many proxy wars. While wielding of power remains the prime motive of these conflicts, many of them are acts of retaliation too. Partly, it can be attributed to deficiency in the spiritual and ethical values that are much affecting the contemporary international relations. Wars are being waged for establishing the so-called democracies, overthrowing dictatorships, wars on terror, and wars to liberate people from state oppressions. 

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JNU Debate and Ambedkar: Truths and Lies
Prof. Satish Kumar & Dr. Virendar Singh

JNU Library will be named on Ambedkar. This decision has been taken by the highest body of the University that is the Executive Council. For the last few months the Akhil Bhartiye Bidhyarthi Parishad was demanding that Library should be named on Ambedkar. This is irony that left and radical left wing organizations believe that Ambedkar is merely the leader of Dalits. 

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Growing Atrocities on Dalits: Ambedkar’s Legacy and Its Contemporary Relevance
Dr. Alok Kumar Gupta

The atrocities on Dalits at Una1 (Gujarat), the institutional murder of Rohit Vemula, and ever growing crimes against Dalits along with the statements against reservations by a section of RSS leaders, have brought once again the issues of Dalit emancipation and cast discrimination on the fore as part of an on-going national debate since independence. 

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Gandhi : The Political Philosopher
Dr. Bibudharanjan

Gandhi was a multi-faceted personality. He was a philosopher, social reformer, humanist practical idealist all in one. Gandhian philosophy is the most original contribution in the modern era which has changed the history of India and influenced social changes in many nations of the world. 

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Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar: Messiah of the Masses
Dr. Deepak Yadav

Dr. Ambedkar was a victim of caste discrimination. His parents hailed from the Hindu Mahar caste, which was viewed as “untouchable” by the upper class. Due to this, Ambedkar had to face severe discriminations from every corner of the society. The discrimination and humiliation haunted Ambedkar even at the Army school, run by British government. Fearing social outcry, the teachers would segregate the students of lower class from that of Brahmins and other upper classes.

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The Indian Freedom Struggle beyond the Frontiers under Subash Chandra Bose and the Odia Martyrs in INA
Dr. Dasarathi Bhuiyan

This paper tries to explore   the significant contribution of Odia people to the efforts of INA in the freedom struggle of India. The Indian National Army (Azad Hind Fauz) of Netaji Subhas consisted of many Odia soldiers. The Odia soldiers had displayed their uncommon heroism as an integral part of the Indian National Army of Subhas. This marks perhaps the most significant event in the annals of India’s fight for independence. 

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The Relevance of Mahatma Gandhi in the 21st Century: A Man of Action
Dr. Saleem Ahmad

The first of the names that we heard among the freedom fighters and national heroes is that of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi also known as Mahatma Gandhi, or Bapu. 

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Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar and Development of Water Resources of India
Dr. Sudhir Wadekar

Government of India decided to observe the birth anniversary of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar on April 14 as “Water Day” to sensitize people on managing the precious natural resource.1 Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar is known as the ‘Architect of the Constitution of India. However, he is less known in the field of water resources. 

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Revisiting Gandhi’s Concept of Spiritual Swaraj
Dr. Abha Chauhan Khimta

The meaning of swaraj is often obscure in recent Indian thinking. At least part of this ambiguity may be explained by the modern Indian attempt to trace the word to its original Sanskrit base, and then re-interpret it’s ancient meaning for the modern situation. 

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Human Morality and Social Justice: An Analysis of Gandhi and Ambedkar
Bipin Kumar

The term ‘morality’ covers the vast expanse of differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions. It enables a distinction between those that are right and those that are not. It may refer to certain conventional normative standards or universal ones depending upon one’s vantage. 

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Evaluation of Dr. Ambedkar’s Inter-Disciplinary Approach in Research and Its Relevance in the 21st Century
Dr. Snehil Kacker

Dr. Ambedkar’s ideas have inspired innumerable scholars across disciplines and ages. Dr. Ambedkar was much ahead of his times and contemporaries. He gave crucial insights in the then prevalent problems which hold relevance even till date. Hence his views still have universal appeal.

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Gandhi’s Concept of the Origin and Nature of the Ideal State and His Relevance in Contemporary World : A Brief Overview
Dr. Pratyay Dutta

Revered the world over for his Non-violent philosophy of passive resistance, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was known to his many followers as Mahatma, or “the great soul.” We are today passing through an extremely controversial phase of terrorism and much explosive violence around the world. 

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Ambedkar on Nation and Nationalism
Shalini Prasad

Ambedkar’s notion of nationalism and nation results primarily rest on both political and social aspect. It did not envision a state based on one group dominated body which is primarily the Hindu dominated body. As he was critic on the view of the nationalist leaders like Gandhi and more particularly the Hindu nationalists who just focussed on freeing the country from the clutches of the British rule. 

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Netaji’s Modernism versus Mahatma Gandhi’s Spiritual Swaraj
Dr. Pitam Ghosh

Subhas Chandra Bose, being a Secularist, had an attitude of impartiality towards all religions. According to him, the Government of Free India must have an absolutely neutral and impartial attitude towards all religions and leave it to the choice of every individual to profess or follow a particular religion of his faith; Religion is a private affair, it cannot be made an affair of the State. 

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Safeguards of Minorities Rights in India: Understanding Dr.Ambedkar’s Viewpoints
Dr. Chittaranjan Mallik

The issue of minority is a universal phenomenon. There is no country in the world without having presence of some kind of minority. Yet, the nature of minority, the relationship between minority and majority in the majoritarian democracy and the problems of minorities are different from time to time, region to region and from country to country. 

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Gandhi and His Concept of Peace­ A Way to Conflict Resolution
Dr. Muzammil Ahad Dar & Rameez Raja Mir

Gandhi was a philosopher and his are philosophical techniques to reformation. The concepts Ahisma and Satyagraha had used by Gandhi in its pure Indian traditional colour (Nanda, 1985, 33). Ahimsa and Satyagraha, the two words are a condensed form from Sanskrit language reflecting Indian socio-cultural milieu. Ahimsa and Satyagraha apart from their word meanings need to be understood within Indian socio-cultural context. 

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